Safety Equipment Requirements For Pleasure Craft

Human-powered pleasure craft (including canoes, kayaks, rowboats and rowing shells)

Personal Lifesaving Appliances

One (1) Canadian-approved PFD or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board

Note: A personal flotation device or lifejacket carried on board a human-powered pleasure craft operated in whitewater must be inherently buoyant.

One (1) buoyant heaving line at least 15 m. (49’3”) long. One (1) reboarding device.

Note: A reboarding device is only required if the vertical height that must be climbed to reboard the pleasure craft from the water is over 0.5 m. (1’8”).

Visual Signals

(Only required if the pleasure craft is over 6 m.)

One (1) watertight flashlight.

Six (6) Canadian-approved pyrotechnic distress signals of Type A (Rocket Parachute), B (Multi-Star) or C (Hand).

Note: Pyrotechnic distress signals are not required for a pleasure craft that:

Is operating on a river, canal or lake in which it can never be more than one (1) nautical mile (1.852 km) from shore; or

has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition.

Vessel Safety Equipment

One (1) bailer or manual bilge pump or bilge-pumping arrangements.

Note: A bailer or manual bilge pump is not required for a pleasure craft that cannot hold enough water to make it capsize or a pleasure craft that has watertight compartments that are sealed and not readily accessible.

Navigation equipment

One (1) sound-signalling appliance that meets the applicable standards set out in the Collision Regulations or a sound-signalling device.

Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations.

Note: Navigation lights are only required if the pleasure craft is operated after sunset, before sunrise, or in periods of restricted visibility (fog, falling snow, etc.). For a human-powered vessel, this requirement can be met with a watertight flashlight.

One (1) magnetic compass

Note: A magnetic compass is not required if the pleasure craft is 8 m. (26’3”) or less and is operated within sight of seamarks (navigation marks).

One (1) radar reflector is required under certain conditions.

If everyone on board a paddleboat, a watercycle or a seated-hull, sit-on-top kayak is wearing a lifejacket or personal flotation device of appropriate size, only the following equipment is required on board:

  • A sound-signaling device
  • A watertight flashlight, if operated after sunset, before sunrise, or in periods of restricted visibility (fog, falling snow, etc.).

Note: A personal flotation device or lifejacket carried on board a human- powered pleasure craft operated in whitewater must be inherently buoyant.

Under all other circumstances, the requirements for human-powered craft must be followed.

 

Sail and powered pleasure craft up to 6 m. (19’8″)

Pleasure craft other than Human-powered pleasure craft.

Personal Lifesaving Appliances

One (1) Canadian-approved PFD device or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board. One (1) buoyant heaving line at least than 15 m. (49’3”) long.

One (1) reboarding device.

Note: A reboarding device is only required if the vertical height that must be climbed to reboard the pleasure craft from the water is over 0.5 m (1’8”).

Visual Signals

Only required if boat is equipped with a motor.

One (1) watertight flashlight or three (3) Canadian-approved pyrotechnic distress signals of Type A (Rocket Parachute), B (Multi-Star) or C (Hand) (any combination not using smoke signals).

Note: Pyrotechnic distress signals are not required for a pleasure craft that:

Is operating on a river, canal or lake in which it can never be more than one (1) nautical mile (1.852 km) from shore; or

has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition.

Vessel Safety Equipment

One (1) manual propelling device or one (1) anchor and at least 15 m. (49’3”) of cable, rope or chain in any combination.

One (1) bailer or one (1) manual bilge pump.

Note: A bailer or manual bilge pump is not required for a pleasure craft that cannot hold enough water to make it capsize or a pleasure craft that has watertight compartments that are sealed and not readily accessible.

Navigation equipment

One (1) sound-signalling appliance that meets the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations or a sound-signalling device.

Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations.

Note: Sailing vessels less than 7 m. in length can meet this requirement with a watertight flashlight .

Note: Navigation lights are only required if the pleasure craft is operated after sunset, before sunrise, or in periods of restricted visibility (fog, falling snow, etc.).

One (1) magnetic compass

Note: A magnetic compass is not required if the pleasure craft is 8 m. (26’3”) or less and

is operated within sight of sea marks (navigation marks).

Firefighting Equipment

One (1) 5BC fire extinguisher if the pleasure craft is equipped with an inboard engine, a fixed fuel tank of any size, or a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigeration appliance.

One (1) radar reflector is required under certain conditions.

Sailboards and Kite boards

If the operator of a sailboard or kite board is wearing a lifejacket or personal flotation device of appropriate size, only the following equipment is required on board:

  • A sound-signaling device.
  • A watertight flashlight, if operated after sunset, before sunrise, or in periods of restricted visibility (fog, falling snow, etc.).

Under all other circumstances the safety equipment requirements for sail and powered pleasure craft up to 6 m. must be followed.

Personal Watercraft (PWC)

If everyone on board is wearing a lifejacket or personal flotation device of appropriate size, only the following equipment is required on board:

  • A sound signalling device;
  • A watertight flashlight or three pyrotechnic distress signals of which none can be smoke signals.
  • A magnetic compass if the PWC is operated outside of seamarks.

Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations if the pleasure craft is operated after sunset, before sunrise, or in periods of restricted visibility.

Under all other circumstances, the safety equipment requirements for sail and powered pleasure craft up to 6 m. must be followed.

 

Sail and powered pleasure craft over 6 m and up to 9 m (19’8″- 29’6″)

Personal Lifesaving Appliances

One (1) Canadian-approved PFD or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board. One (1) buoyant heaving line at least than 15 m. (49’3”) long or one (1) lifebuoy attached to a buoyant line at least 15 m. (49’3”) long.

One (1) reboarding device.

Note: A reboarding device is only required if the vertical height that must be climbed to reboard the pleasure craft from the water is over 0.5 m. (1’8”).

Visual Signals

One (1) watertight flashlight.

Six (6) Canadian-approved pyrotechnic distress signals of: Type A (Rocket Parachute), B (Multi-Star) or C (Hand) (any combination not using smoke signals).

Note: Pyrotechnic distress signals are not required for a pleasure craft that: Is operating on a river, canal or lake in which it can never be more than one (1) nautical mile

(1.852 km.) from shore; or has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition.

Vessel Safety Equipment

One (1) manual propelling device or one (1) anchor and at least 15 m. (49’3”) of cable, rope or chain in any combination.

One (1) bailer or manual bilge pump.

Note: A bailer or manual bilge pump is not required for a pleasure craft that cannot hold enough water to make it capsize or a pleasure craft that has watertight compartments that are sealed and not readily accessible.

Navigation equipment

One (1) sound-signalling appliance that meets the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations or a sound-signalling device.

Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations.

Note: Sailing vessels less than 7 m. in length can meet this requirement with a watertight flashlight. Navigation lights are only required if the pleasure craft is operated after sunset, before sunrise, or in periods of restricted visibility (fog, falling snow, etc.).

You can learn more about the requirements for your pleasure craft by consulting the navigation lights section of the Safe Boating Guide.

One (1) magnetic compass.

Note: A magnetic compass is not required if the pleasure craft is 8 m. (26’3”) or less and

is operated within sight of sea marks (navigation marks).

Firefighting Equipment

One (1) 5BC fire extinguisher if the pleasure craft is equipped with a motor and

One (1) 5BC fire extinguisher if the pleasure craft is equipped with a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigeration appliance.

One (1) radar reflector is required under certain conditions.

Sail and powered pleasure craft over 9 m. and up to 12 m. (29’6″- 39’4″)

Personal Lifesaving Appliances

One (1) Canadian-approved PFD device or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board. One (1) buoyant heaving line at least than 15 m. (49’3”) long.

One (1) lifebuoy attached to a buoyant line at least 15 m. (49’3”) long. One (1) reboarding device.

Note: A reboarding device is only required if the vertical height that must be climbed to reboard the pleasure craft from the water is over 0.5 m. (1’8”).

Visual Signals

One (1) watertight flashlight.

Twelve (12) Canadian-approved pyrotechnic signals of: Type A (Rocket Parachute), B (Multi-Star),C (Hand), or D (smoke signals).

Note: Not more than six (6) of which are of Type D (smoke signals). Pyrotechnic distress signals are not required for a pleasure craft that:

Is operating on a river, canal or lake in which it can never be more than one (1) nautical mile (1.852 km) from shore; or

has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition.

Vessel Safety Equipment

One (1) anchor and at least 30 m. (98’5”) of cable, rope or chain in any combination. One (1) manual bilge pump or bilge-pumping arrangements.

Note: A bailer or manual bilge pump is not required for a pleasure craft that cannot hold enough water to make it capsize or a pleasure craft that has watertight compartments that are sealed and not readily accessible.

Navigation equipment

One (1) sound-signalling appliance that meets the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations or a sound-signalling device.

Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations.

One (1) magnetic compass.

Firefighting Equipment

One (1) 10BC fire extinguisher if the pleasure craft is equipped with motor AND

One (1) 10BC fire extinguisher if the pleasure craft is equipped with a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigeration appliance.

One (1) radar reflector is required under certain conditions.

Sail and powered pleasure craft over 12 m. and up to 24 m. (39’4″- 78’9″)

Personal Lifesaving Appliances

One (1) Canadian-approved personal flotation device or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board.

One (1) buoyant heaving line at least than 15 m. (49’3”) long.

One (1) lifebuoy equipped with a self-igniting light or attached to a buoyant line at least 15 m. long. One (1) reboarding device.

Note: A reboarding device is only required if the vertical height that must be climbed to reboard the pleasure craft from the water is over 0.5 m. (1’8”).

Visual Signals

One (1) watertight flashlight.

Twelve (12) Canadian-approved pyrotechnic distress signals of: Type A (Rocket Parachute), B (Multi-Star), C (Hand), or D (smoke signals).

Note: Not more than six (6) of which are of Type D (smoke signals). Pyrotechnic distress signals are not required for a pleasure craft that:

Is operating on a river, canal or lake in which it can never be more than one (1) nautical mile (1.852 km) from shore; or has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition.

Vessel Safety Equipment

One (1) anchor and at least 50 m. (164’1”) of cable, rope or chain in any combination. Bilge-pumping arrangements.

Navigation equipment

Sound-signalling appliances that meets the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations.

Note: pleasure craft over 20 m. (65’7”) in length require a whistle (horn), and a fitted bell.

Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations.

You can learn more about the requirements for your pleasure craft by consulting the navigation lights section of the Safe Boating Guide.

One (1) magnetic compass that meets the requirements of the Navigation Safety Regulations See Part 2 of the Regulations if your pleasure craft was built before July 1, 2002 OR See Part 3 of the Regulations if your pleasure craft was built on or after July 1, 2002.

Firefighting Equipment

One (1) 10BC fire extinguisher at all of the following locations: at each

access to any space where a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance is fitted; at the entrance to any accommodation space; and at the entrance to the machinery space.

One (1) axe

Two (2) buckets

Note: Transport Canada recommends that each bucket have a capacity of at least 10 litres.

One (1) radar reflector is required under certain conditions.

Sail and powered pleasure craft over 24 m. (78’9″)

Personal Lifesaving Appliances

One (1) Canadian-approved personal flotation device or lifejacket of appropriate size for each person on board.

One (1) buoyant heaving line at least than 30 m. (98’5”) long.

Two (2) SOLAS lifebuoys, of which: one (1) is attached to a buoyant line at least 30 m. (98 ‘5”) long; and one (1) is equipped with a self-igniting light.

Lifting harness with appropriate rigging. One (1) reboarding device .

Note: A reboarding device is only required if the vertical height that must be climbed to reboard the pleasure craft from the water is over 0.5 m. (1’8”).

Visual Signals

One (1) watertight flashlight.

Twelve (12) Canadian-approved pyrotechnic distress signals of: Type A (Rocket Parachute), B (Multi-Star), C (Hand), or D (smoke signals).

Note: Not more than six (6) of which are of Type D (smoke signals).

Pyrotechnic distress signals are not required for a pleasure craft that: Is operating on a river, canal or lake in which it can never be more than one (1) nautical mile (1.852 km) from shore; or has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition.

Vessel Safety Equipment

One (1) anchor and at least 50 m. (164’1”) of cable, rope or chain in any combination. Bilge-pumping arrangements.

Navigation equipment

Sound-signalling appliances that meets the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations Note: Pleasure craft over 20 m. (65’7”) in length require a whistle (horn), and a fitted bell. Navigation lights that meet the requirements set out in the Collision Regulations

You can learn more about the requirements for your pleasure craft by consulting the navigation lights section of the Safe Boating Guide.

One (1) magnetic compass that meets the requirements set out in the Navigation Safety Regulations

See Part 2 of the Regulations if your pleasure craft was built before July 1, 2002 OR

See Part 3 of the Regulations if your pleasure craft was built on or after July 1, 2002.

Firefighting Equipment

One (1) 10BC fire extinguisher at all of the following locations:

at each access to any space where a fuel-burning cooking, heating or refrigerating appliance is fitted; at the entrance to any accommodation space; and at the entrance to the machinery space.

One (1) power-driven fire pump located outside the machinery space, with one fire hose and nozzle that can direct water into any part of the boat.

Two (2) axes

Four (4) buckets

Note: Transport Canada recommends that each bucket have a capacity of at least 10 litres.

One (1) radar reflector is required under certain conditions.

Requirements for pleasure craft involved in competition

A Pleasure craft and its crew engaged in racing may carry alternative safety equipment when engaged in formal training, an official competition or final preparation for an official competition. Read on to see if your event or training sessions qualify for this exemption.

Official competition: A competition or regatta organized by a governing body, a club or an organization affiliated with a governing body.

Formal training: Practice for an official competition under the supervision of a coach or official certified by a governing body.

Final preparation for an official competition: Activities to prepare for the competition that take place at the competition venue and during the times specified by the organizer of the competition.

Governing body: A water sport governing body that publishes rules and criteria respecting conduct and safety requirements during skill demonstrations, formal training or official competitions and that:

  • certifies coaches and coaching programs
  • certifies officials and programs for officials; or
  • recommends training and safety guidelines for certified coaches or

Safety craft: A boat, aircraft or other means of transport with a crew on board that is used for surveillance and lifeguarding activities during formal training or official competitions.

Alternative equipment for racing canoes, racing kayaks and rowing shells

A racing canoe or racing kayak that is engaged in formal training, in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition that is governed by safety guidelines and procedures established by the governing body is not required to carry on board the safety equipment required by the Small Vessel Regulations if it is attended by a safety craft that is carrying on board a personal flotation device or lifejacket of an appropriate size:

  1. for each person on board the canoe or kayak, if the safety craft is attending only one pleasure craft; or
  2. for each person on board the canoe or kayak with the most persons on board, if the safety craft is attending more than one pleasure craft.

If the canoe or kayak is not attended by a safety craft, it is required to carry on board the following safety equipment:

  1. a personal flotation device or lifejacket of an appropriate size for each person on board;
  2. a sound-signalling device; and
  3. a watertight flashlight, if the canoe or kayak is operated after sunset or before sunrise or in periods of restricted visibility.

A rowing shell that is competing in a provincially, nationally or internationally sanctioned regatta or competition, or engaged in training at the venue at which the regatta or competition is taking place, is not required to carry on board the safety equipment required by the Small Vessel Regulations.

A rowing shell that is engaged in activities governed by safety guidelines and procedures established by the governing body is not required to carry on board the safety equipment required by this part if it is attended by a safety craft that is carrying on board a personal flotation device or lifejacket of an appropriate size:

  1. for each person on board the rowing shell, if the safety craft is attending only one rowing shell; or
  2. for each person on board the rowing shell with the most persons on board, if the safety craft is attending more than one rowing shell.

If the rowing shell is not attended by a safety craft, it is required to carry on board only the following safety equipment:

  1. a personal flotation device or lifejacket of an appropriate size for each person on board;
  2. a sound-signalling device; and
  3. a watertight flashlight, if the canoe or kayak is operated after sunset or before sunrise or in periods of restricted visibility.

Alternative equipment for racing-type pleasure craft

Racing-type pleasure craft (other than racing canoes, kayaks or rowing shells) engaged in formal training, in an official competition or in final preparation for an official competition, operated under conditions of clear visibility, and is attended by a safety craft, may carry on board the safety equipment that is required by the rules of the governing body instead of the safety equipment required by the

Regulations.

Personal protection equipment

Small Vessel

About 90 percent of people who drown in recreational boating incidents are not wearing a flotation device. A lifejacket or personal flotation device (PFD) is the best insurance you can have. Find one that suits your needs and wear it.

By law, pleasure craft must have enough Canadian approved flotation devices of the appropriate size for everyone on board. You can choose between lifejackets and PFDs. Remember, lifesaving cushions are not approved as personal flotation equipment on any vessel.